Daily Archive : Tuesday October 24, 2017

News

Sports

Business

  •  

    Clarification: Hurricane Maria-Tourism story

    Clarification: Hurricane Maria-Tourism story

  •  
    Nicholas Merker

    Can you legally protect a Bitcoin transaction?

    Although the blockchain's functionality as a public ledger provides efficiencies to transactions, the lack of a central authority creates a legal enigma.

  •  

    Enrollment News To Bank On: Obamacare Is Still Here So It’s Time For Coverage Checkup

    The open enrollment period begins in one week for 2018 marketplace coverage, but many consumers are confused about what to expect. No wonder! The Trump administration has slashed advertising and outreach about open enrollment, so concrete consumer information is sparse. But there’s more than enough political rhetoric to make up for it, with regular partisan pronouncements that the marketplaces have collapsed and Obamacare is dead. Further muddying the waters on 2018 coverage was the Trump administration’s decision this month to cut off government payments to fund subsidies some marketplace customers receive to reduce their out-of-pocket costs, and a subsequent congressional proposal to restore them.

  •  
    Elmhurst Hospital has added eight new beds to its emergency department. Dr. Michelle Meziere, the department’s associate medical director, and Adam Johnson, the department’s director, give a tour Tuesday of the addition.

    Elmhurst Hospital completes expansion of emergency department

    With the addition of eight beds, the hospital’s emergency department could potentially accommodate 12,000 to 15,000 additional visits a year. And that extra capacity could translate into shorter wait times for patients.

  •  
    FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2014, file photo, Chase Iron Eyes, an attorney and American Indian activist on the Standing Rock Reservation, is seen in Fort Yates, N.D. Iron Eyes, who is accused of inciting a riot during protests against the Dakota Access pipeline says he'll seek to present a "necessity defense." That's justifying a crime by arguing it prevented a greater harm. Iron Eyes has pleaded not guilty to inciting a riot and criminal trespass. He could face more than five years in prison if convicted at trial in February 2018. (AP Photo/Kevin Cederstrom, File)

    Oil pipeline opponent uses 'necessity defense' _ What is it?

    An American Indian activist and former U.S. congressional candidate in North Dakota accused of inciting a riot during protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline says he'll seek to present a "necessity defense."

  •  

    Purdue prof's company to adapt Blu-ray for cancer detection

    A company founded by a Purdue University scientist has landed nearly $200,000 in funding to adapt Blu-ray technology into a device capable of detecting early-stage cancers

  •  
    Peapod online grocer is relocating its headquarters from Skokie to downtown Chicago, but will continue operating its Lake Zurich warehouse. In this photo from July, Paul Wilson delivers groceries to a home in Deer Park.

    Peapod to move headquarters from Skokie to Chicago

    Peapod online grocer is relocating its headquarters from Skokie to downtown Chicago.

  •  
    This image released by AMC shows Melissa McBride as Carol Peletier, left, and Norman Reedus as Daryl Dixon in a scene from "The Walking Dead." The eighth season premieres on Oct. 22. (Gene Page/AMC via AP)

    Viewership down for 'Walking Dead' debut

    Viewership for Sunday's season premiere of 'The Walking Dead' is off 33 percent from last fall's opener

  •  
    This Monday, July 24, 2017, photo shows the Caterpillar logo on the front of a Caterpillar 725C end dump truck at a dealer in Miami. Caterpillar, Inc. reports earnings Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    Caterpillar profit surges on equipment demand

    Caterpillar's 3Q profit surges on equipment demand, prompting guidance boost

  •  
    FILE - This Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, file photo shows the Cadillac logo, a General Motors Co. brand, on display on a vehicle at the Pittsburgh International Auto Show in Pittsburgh. General Motors Co. reports earnings Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

    GM, other US industrial giants, hit all-time highs

    Shares of General Motors hit an all-time Tuesday as investors focused on a $2.5 billion third-quarter pretax profit and ignored a big accounting loss.

  •  
    Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, a Tennessee Republican, talks Tuesday to reporters about President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    The Corker vs. Trump feud escalates into war of insults

    The feud between President Donald Trump and Sen. Bob Corker escalated with the president calling the senator “incompetent” and Corker accusing Trump of “debasing our nation” in an angry back-and-forth that could complicate the GOP’s path to a tax overhaul.

  •  
    FILE — In this Sunday, March 22, 2015, file photo, a repairman installs a Whirlpool water heater at a home in Los Angeles. Sears will no longer sell Whirlpool appliances, ending a business partnership that dates make more than 100 years. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File) The Associated Press

    Sears-Whirlpool end relationship after 100 years

    Sears will no longer sell Whirlpool appliances, ending a business relationship that dates back more than 100 years.

  •  

    Recent editorials published in Indiana newspapers

    Excerpts of editorials published recently in Indiana newspapers

  •  
    As part of its comprehensive national plan to combat drug abuse, Walgreens is now stocking Narcan, an FDA-approved nasal form of naloxone, in all of its more than 8,000 pharmacies nationwide.

    Walgreens stocking Narcan nasal spray in all pharmacies nationwide

    As part of its comprehensive national plan to combat drug abuse, Walgreens is now stocking Narcan, an FDA-approved nasal form of naloxone, in all of its more than 8,000 pharmacies nationwide.

  •  
    Eby-Brown Company LLC in Naperville is buying AJ Silberman, a wholesale distributor to convenience store retailers in Pennsylvania.

    Naperville’s Eby-Brown expands in Pennsylvania

    Eby-Brown Company LLC in Naperville said it will buy AJ Silberman, a wholesale distributor to convenience store retailers in Indianola, Pennsylvania.

  •  
    Goosehead Insurance, The Kevin Boggs Agency opened earlier this month at 125 E. Lake St., Suite 207, Bloomingdale.

    Goosehead Insurance agency opens in Bloomingdale

    Goosehead Insurance, The Kevin Boggs Agency opened earlier this month at 125 E. Lake St., Suite 207, Bloomingdale.

  •  
    FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2013, file photo, a woman walks her dog past a vintage Santa Claus holiday window display at Lord & Taylor department store in New York. A real estate startup called WeWork Cos. is announcing a deal to buy Lord & Taylor’s storied flagship in Manhattan for $850 million. The transaction, announced Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, is part of an overall plan by Lord & Taylor’s parent Hudson’s Bay Co. to pare down its debt and reinvigorate the chain. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    Lord & Taylor selling flagship Fifth Avenue store to WeWork

    Lord & Taylor's flagship Manhattan store being sold to office space sharing company WeWork

  •  
    This Monday, April 24, 2017, photo shows a McDonald's restaurant in downtown Pittsburgh. McDonald's Corp. reports earnings Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    McDiscount: $1 soda, 2 for $5 deals lure more to McDonald's

    Cheap soda and burgers helped bring more people into McDonald's.

  •  

    Delphi acquires self-driving startup nuTonomy for $450m

    Auto supplier Delphi acquires self-driving software startup nuTonomy for $450 million

  •  

    Judge Questions Claims That Ceasing Obamacare Insurance Subsidies Hurts Consumers

    SAN FRANCISCO - A federal judge Monday expressed skepticism that President Donald Trump’s decision to halt certain health law insurance subsidies would cause consumers immediate harm, as California and many other states claim in a lawsuit. U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria said he would issue a ruling in the case Tuesday. Earlier this month, Trump announced that the administration would stop payments that compensate insurers for discounts given to low-income consumers to help cover their out-of-pocket expenses under policies sold on the Affordable Care Act’s insurance marketplaces. These subsidies are different from the tax credits many consumers get, depending on their income, to pay Obamacare premiums. The lawsuit was filed by 18 states and the District of Columbia, led by California Attorney General Xavier Beccera. It seeks an emergency restraining order compelling the Trump administration to resume the Obamacare payments. Nationwide, cost-sharing payments were expected to total $7 billion this year. Since assuming office in January, Trump has repeatedly threatened to stop the subsidies, known as cost sharing reduction (CSR) payments. But he held off while Republicans in Congress were working to replace the ACA. Republicans have argued that the subsidies are illegal because they have not been approved by Congress and that they amount to a bailout for insurers. Responding to the uncertainty, a number of states have allowed insurers to raise their premiums. California earlier this month ordered insurers to add a surcharge to some policies next year, to offset the potential loss in federal funding and keep the individual insurance market stable. The 12.4 percent surcharge was added to silver plans only, the second-least expensive tier. “California is doing a really good job in responding to the termination of [cost-sharing reduction] payments in a way that is avoiding harm for people and actually benefiting people,” said Judge Chhabria. He said that the vast majority of states have “seen the writing on the wall” and chosen to respond by increasing premiums for silver plans. That, in turn, will force the federal government to give higher tax credits to most consumers, so they won’t feel any financial pinch. Under intense questioning by the judge, California Deputy Attorney General Gregory Brown acknowledged that California has done a lot to mitigate the harm to consumers. But he said the administration’s actions are destabilizing the exchanges and the individual insurance market, and causing chaos for states and consumers just eight days before enrollment begins Nov. 1. Some experts and states are concerned jumpy insurers will bolt from the market and leave some regions with minimal or no choices for coverage. However, a bipartisan bill in Congress would restore the cost-sharing subsidies and aims to stabilize the insurance markets. But it’s not clear the bill will muster the support it needs to pass both the Senate and House or whether Trump would sign it. In California, 1.4 million people buy their own coverage through the state marketplace, and 90 percent receive federal subsidies that reduce what they pay. During the hearing, Chhabria read from a Covered California press release that predicts how the changes will affect consumers in 2018. It notes that even though silver plan premiums will rise as a result of the surcharge, the federal tax credits will also increase to cover the rise in premiums. That will leave 4 out of 5 consumers with monthly premiums that stay the same or decrease. The judge also said ruling in favor of the restraining order would mean insurance companies could essentially “double collect” - benefiting from both the premium increases from the surcharge on silver plans and the cost-sharing subsidies.

  •  
    FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2017, file photo, Mika Brzezinski attends FX's "The Americans" season five premiere in New York. The “Morning Joe” co-host will publish three works over the next two years in her “Know Your Value” series, Hachette Books told The Associated Press on Tuesday, Oct. 24. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

    Mika Brzezinski sets release dates for next 3 books

    Mika Brzezinski (brzezin-ski) has release dates set for her next three books

  •  
    This April 26, 2017, photo shows the Eli Lilly & Co. corporate headquarters in Indianapolis. Eli Lilly & Co. reports earnings Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    Lilly tops Street 3Q forecasts, considers business sale

    Eli Lilly beats 3Q earnings and revenue expectations

  •  
    Geneva intends to ask voters to increase its sales tax in a referendum in March. And if rejected, the city could instead institute a places-for-eating tax, under measures the city council discussed Monday.

    Genevans to vote on sales tax increase, with specter of dining tax

    Geneva plans to ask for a sales-tax increase in a March referendum. And if it fails, it could institute a places-for-eating tax, according to measures introduced Monday.

  •  
    Barrington village board trustees have agreed to provide a grant to help boost the exterior appearance of a new restaurant that replaced Boloney’s Sandwich Shop adjacent to the downtown Catlow Theater.

    Barrington gives facade grant to Showtime Eatery

    Barrington trustees have agreed to provide a grant to help boost the appearance of a new restaurant that replaced Boloney’s Sandwich Shop adjacent to the downtown Catlow Theater.

Life & Entertainment

Discuss

  •  

    A Republican president said things that needed to be said
    Columnist Kathleen Parker: George W. Bush’s speech last week at a forum hosted by his eponymous institute might as well have been titled “Dear Donald.”

  •  

    It’s what we do that counts

    Columnist Lee Hamilton: However dire things appear in Washington, I believe we have it within us to set the country back on a productive track.

  •  

    There may be no ‘fix’ for gun violence
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: After one absorbs the shock and horror of the Las Vegas mass shooting, the significant question is “What is the fix?”

  •  

    Column for a bird cage
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I don’t have a bird cage, but I almost went out and bought one just so I could put her editorial of Oct. 18,

  •  

    Pence NFL walk-off an expensive stunt
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: At an Oct. 8 NFL game, the White House pulled off a very expensive stunt. At the cost of more than $30,000 an hour, we taxpayers paid for the use of Air Force Two and we covered the massive security and logistical expenses — to fly VP Pence to the game just so he could walk off when some of the players knelt during the anthem.

  •  

    A suggestion on North Korea
    A Gilberts letter to the editor: The only way to solve the North Korea problem, short of war, is diplomacy.

  •  

    Today’s Opinion Page editorial cartoon
    Today’s Daily Herald Opinion page editorial cartoon

«Sep

Oct 2017

Nov»
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4